Cover + Release Date: Better Luck This Time

Hello, fellow bookworms! Brooke here. I just changed the domain and name of my blog, so don’t be too confused. This is the new and improved older sister of my books and brooke blog.

While my blog focused originally on reviewing books, I now plan to share more about myself and my own writing in addition to the reviews. I will definitely still be writing reviews since, as I suspect you all know, I love reading and sharing my opinions.

Now onto personal book news…

I’ve written and set a release date for my new YA suspense novel and sequel to The Half TheftBetter Luck This Time. The story begins just minutes after the conclusion to the first book. There is nothing I love more than picking up right where we left off!

For those of you who read the first book, you might understand the title of The Half Theft sequel already, but I promise I won’t spoil it for anyone who hasn’t given it a read yet.

I am in the process of reading through my (hopefully) final draft of the book, and I’ve set the release date to October 1st. What better day to release a book than my birthday?

The Blurb:

Separated after their lethal night inside the museum, the team flees from Collinswood to seek shelter and tend to their wounded. Surrounded by allies, running from their enemies, things appear clear enough on the surface, but nothing is quite as it seems. As years-old lies are uncovered and trustworthiness is questioned, friendships must be put to the test.

When Charlie and Elle find a clue to the next step in the Ducartes’ schemes, they also dig up a darker fate and the truth behind the criminal family’s actions—one whose aim is much larger and much deadlier than ever before.

The fight against the Ducartes, a fight in the family’s own arena, becomes a race against time, as their own goal finally becomes clear: revenge.

I am so, so excited to share with you the second and final half of my duology.

I’ve spent years putting excessive time and effort to make this not the perfect story, but my favorite story with my favorite characters, who I only hope you’ll fall in love with as much as I have.

If you’re interested in Better Luck This Time but haven’t read its predecessor, feel free to click here to check out the thrilling (says me, the author) first chapter in the fight for the city of Collinswood.

Monsters of Men by Patrick Ness

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

Well, Patrick Ness has done it again. I can’t even begin to describe my feelings for this book without first saying that I am utterly in love. The characters. The story. The structure. The writing. The different POVs. It’s all one big chef’s kiss, and an utterly perfect end to a perfect trilogy.

Let’s start with the characters, because that’s one of the places where these books really shine. In Monsters of Men, I somehow developed even more conflicted feelings regarding the mayor. I mean, I like him, but I’m also scared of him, but I’m also intrigued by him, but I also hate him, but I still want to trust him for some reason. He’s easily one of the best written characters I’ve ever read in any book. He’s utterly fascinating.

Next up: the story. My favorite part of Chaos Walking’s story is its originality. Usually when I read a book or a series, I can connect certain aspects, sometimes even many, back to one or more previously written stories (which makes sense, since all ideas have to come from somewhere). However, I really don’t see Patrick Ness’ story ideas elsewhere. The universe, the dynamic between the general populations of men and women, the individual characters and their key traits and their journeys—it’s so unlike anything I’ve read before.

This leads to the writing, which is another place where these books really stand out from all others in their genre. English teachers, beware. There are a whole lot of incomplete sentences in this book, even ones that use…periods at the end. And enough em dashes to sink a ship. All of which only lead to a more dynamic story. The action scenes in Monsters of Men are unlike any other, drawing me in completely until I feel like I’m inside the scene, experiencing the story.

Now, many of the things I’ve previously listed can be applied to all three of the Chaos Walking books, but the POVs in the final installation are completely their own. The Knife of Never Letting Go has one POV. The Ask and the Answer features two. Monsters of Men ups the game even more, and it couldn’t have been a more perfect strategy. It is clear the author knows exactly whose viewpoints his readers want to hear throughout the story.

The one teeny, tiny part of this book I have to admit isn’t my favorite is the romantic aspect. Todd and Viola, individually, are fantastic characters I have been rooting for (almost) since the moment I met them—Todd was kind of a jerk at first, so I took a minute to warm up to him. But I did, in time! My problem is that I don’t really care about their relationship in a romantic way at all. I loved them as friends, and I enjoyed the first book in particular because that’s what they were. Friends. As the books progressed, however, they became more and more romance based, and Todd and Viola began acting like they’d known each other forever, not for the short while they actually had.

But I digress. Monsters of Men was simply another beautiful installation in the fantastic series that is Chaos Walking. If you ask me, it is the perfect end to a perfect trilogy.